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Road Trip

Image may contain: 2 people, eyeglasses and closeup Going on a road trip sounds like such a fun idea, at least we thought it did. We planned, got things together weeks in advance. Actually, more like months. (For my husband, he’s dreamed of doing this for years.) Who knew the one thing we would absolutely need, the plates for the RV, wouldn’t be ready before we left. Call it a hold up in paperwork from the dealer.The temporary plates expire halfway into our planned trip. A complication we weren’t expecting. Our plans shifted at the last minute, destinations had to change, and new lists were made, some before we left, and others along the way. Still, with all the lists life is what happens in the middle of the best-laid plans.

Can I insert here, Major Learning Curve!!! No amount of planning keeps you from forgetting something. I know right where I left it at home too. Nor does it help with the actual set up the RV, and remembering all the little tricks and steps. Although, I’m sure in time it will become old hat to us. If we can ever stay out long enough to acquire the skills needed and a Ph.D. in road travel. In the short time we’ve been on the road we have gained a thorough knowledge of rest stops along the way, though.(Our inside joke,)

On our first day, we left too late to get a campground they were all full. We slept in the Cracker Barrel parking lot with a few other folks in RVs. Who knew it would be one of the coldest days in Colorado this year. Let’s call it a frosty morning upon waking up and leave it at that.

On Day two,  we got to our first destination the beautiful city of Santa Fe, NM. where the old and new meet in a very eye pleasing way. I love the adobe homes there. After a few snafus, we had our new home safely tucked in a great spot for the next three days. One of our changes in plans. The park was so peaceful and we were so rattled it seemed like the perfect place to light for several days. We actually thought about turning around and going home. I know it’s crazy and at this point, we were almost there ourselves. I also tried to exercise in the motorhome on my mini tramp, which was equally interesting, I now exercise outside.

On the day we left the beautiful park, Rob and I got faulty directions and crossed wires, that sent me on a nerve-wracking trip about sixty miles round trip out of my way, which made yesterday’s uneventful day of travel truly a beautiful experience for us. We aren’t going anywhere today. It’s nice to do nothing every once in a while. Tomorrow we’ll see where the road takes us or as my kids use to ask us constantly are we there yet?

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Journey To Find My Blue Cove

Image may contain: Iona M Morrison, eyeglasses and closeup This will be home for me for the next several weeks as we take a bit of time to travel. I’m in search of the town that I dreamed up in my head. Now, I understand that Blue Cove is a figment of my imagination, but I hope to find a few places that will inspire me to keep writing, and thinking about my characters. They need to see new things right along side of me.

We wanted to travel to Northern California up to Oregon, but there are a few too many fires in that area right now. We thought about the East Coast, but there is a hurricane on the way to the Carolinas. I wonder what that says about our trip at this point. My husband has drawn up several plans only to have to remake them. I think in the end it will be a surprise for both of us. I haven’t been out of Colorado in quite a while so I’d be happy to go and see almost anything except for fires, hurricanes, earthquakes, floods, and most natural disasters in general.

I hope you’ll settle in with me, as I blog in words and pictures over the next several weeks what it’s like to live in a house on wheels. I am excited to have the freedom to travel, and see a few sights from this great country. I’m sure there will be a learning curve, but I hope to meet some new folks along the way. Let’s put it this way, if I don’t my husband will shut off his hearing aids, and our trip might be cut short. I’m social, a bit of a chatty Kathy, and him, well, not so much.

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The Final Flashpoint

I have a new book that will be released October 17. The Final Flashpoint is book six in the Blue Cove Mystery Series. I never intended to write a series when I wrote The Harvest Club, but I enjoyed my characters, and they seemed to hang around waiting for me to write another story. Their story. They’ve become a part of me, occupying a bit of the real estate in mind, and I am still here six books later.

Those who read my books like the characters too. As a matter of fact, I’ve had people come up to me at various events and tell me not kill off the heroine or hero, Jessie and Matt or they will be mad. I have no intention of killing them. I would rather let them ride off into the sunset. I am that attached to them.

I hope you’ll pick up a copy of The Final Flashpoint it should be on Amazon for pre-orders soon. I’m excited about this book and loved it from the first scene to the last. I may say this a lot, but this one is my favorites. At least  right now it is.


Revenge-The Final Flashpoint

Jessie rolled onto her side and drifted off to sleep. A swirling mist drew her to the edge of the woods. She couldn’t see anything through the dense fog, only a narrow pathway twisting around the trees. Enticing, the foggy haze seduced her to move one step closer. Jessie paused. She didn’t want to go in alone. Panicking, she started to turn back before it was too late.

“Jess,” Matt’s faint voice called out to her. He sounded wheezy and breathless, and she could hear the pain in his voice. Where was he? She glanced around, hoping to see his familiar face.

“Jess…” The call came again. She shivered. Matt was in the darkness, and death had come to play. The faces of those tortured young men danced in the mist before her. Her feet refused to move. She was paralyzed with fear. The silence around her was deafening. “

Jess,” he screamed out her name once more, trusting her to aid him. Tears filled her eyes, spilling down her cheeks. This time there was no way she could help…

Do The Unexpected

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Err on the Side of Compassion

Iona Morrison I have been pushed through a rough patch in life lately. It seems when things happen they come in a clumps; never in ones or twos, but in several, leaving me feeling numb and slightly overwhelmed. I am not complaining because I know I am not the only one in the world to face a time of sorrow and loss. It has however given me a fresh perspective as I face things happening around me. I try hard to stay out of politics. To be sure, I know what I think, but how I do. may not be how you do, and I don’t want to risk friendships over politics by any means. So this note comes with a warning if you feel differently about what I  am about to write I am only stating something from the sadness I feel inside of me and it’s not meant to tell you what to think, but what I’m thinking.

I almost cried when I heard that our country is thinking of  separating children from their parents at the border as a deterrent. Life separates us too soon as it is. I yearn for more time with those who I have recently lost. One last look at their face, a few more kind words spoken in loving ways. And listening to them, really listening to what they are saying. The trauma of separation is a lot to handle as a reasoning adult, but is so much harder for a child. Ask my husband who lost his father at an early age.

I can still remember the photos of children that I saw walking through the Holocaust Memorial who had been separated from their parents one or both, facing certain death. I cried photo after photo. Children should be protected, but never taken from parents who care for them and love them. A foster home is for a child in need of loving attention not for children who have parents who would risk all in their love for them.

Life is tough enough without adding more to the load humanity is carrying. I guess I believe in my heart like he said that if I show mercy, mercy will be shown to me. I remember when I held my first child in my arms and the overwhelming love and sense of fear I felt at the same time. I would have done anything for him and my others as they came along. Much like my Irish and Scottish ancestors I would have left my own country to give them a better life if necessary. (No, they didn’t all come here legally.)

I read this from a letter / Life Lesson by David Weismann: “I don’t try to distinguish the authentic needy person from the phony. I don’t worry about enabling alcoholics and drug addicts or about being scammed or hoodwinked. Of everyone with a hard luck story or an outstretched arm, I assume the best, not the worst.

Are there times when the people I give money to are phonies? I’m sure there are. But who am I to second-guess the truth of another human being’s circumstances? What if I’m wrong in my assessment and the person really is hungry or really has no place to live or really can’t find a job and is unable to pay the rent or doesn’t have the money to pay the fare to visit a sick parent?

I consider myself very fortunate. I live quite well. I’ve been blessed. I’ve really never known what it is to not have enough food to eat or not to have a roof over my head or not to enjoy many physical comforts of life. God has been good to me. But I also recognize that there but for the grace of God go I. And I don’t know how I would manage if I went to bed hungry every night or had no place to live,”

Thankfully, I have never known true hunger or want nor have my children. I want to keep my arms open wide to bless others in the manner I have been blessed. I will err on the side of compassion and want to believe that others would do the same for me.